Lesson Three Paul the Apostle

Biblical scholars often claim that the Apostle Paul is the most important, most controversial, and least understood figure in earliest Christianity. A Jewish persecutor of Jesus’s first followers, he became Christianity’s most visible and provocative advocate, a key agent in extending membership to gentiles. His influence extended to Martin Luther in the 15th century, the founder of the Protestant movement.

Paul stands as one of the towering figures in the history of Christianity, his influence extending far beyond his time and place. Born as Saul of Tarsus, a zealous Pharisee persecuting early followers of Jesus, he underwent a dramatic conversion experience that transformed him into a fervent preacher and missionary. His missionary journeys, theological writings, and enduring legacy continue to shape Christian theology and practice millennia later.

From his encounters on dusty roads of Judea to his profound theological reflections, Paul’s story offers inspiration, challenge, and profound insights into the nature of faith, grace, and the Christian life.

outside our New Testament records we have very little additional historical information about Paul other than the valuable tradition that Jerome preserves for us that he was born in the Galilee.  While pointing to him as s an example of heroic faith, the early Christian writers of the second century (the “Apostolic Fathers”) mention his name less than a dozen times, with nothing of historical interest related by any of them.

LIFE STORY OF PAUL
rOAD TO dAMACUS
MISSIONARY JORNEYS OF PAUL
THEOLOGY OF PAUL
lETTERS OF pAUL