The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survival

The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survivial

The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survivial

A story set in the Russian forests bordering China, Vallant explores man’s long relationship with big cats. Along the way, he describes a society that Americans would never recognize – the Russian peasant – and his tenuous survival in a world beset with bureaucrats, life-and-death conditions, and bravery
 
Tigers are nature’s last word in mammalian weapons design. Big as three NFL linebackers bundled into one, armed with claws longer than fingers and jaws rated on a strength-scale used for dinosaurs, tigers are built like missiles and can out-swim, out-climb, out-fox and out-run just about anything that breathes. That’s the bad news; the worse news is, they’re also armed with memory and invisibility. “I have seen all the other animals,” one poacher says, “but I have never seen a tiger–not once.”
 
The story of a desperate poacher who picked the wrong tiger to accost, the story engages the reader on political, socioeconomic, and conservation fronts in order to explain how the stage was set for a deadly showdown. In 1997, deep in the remote Russian backcountry, a gigantic Amur tiger begins acting like the only thing more savage than a wild animal–us. It doesn’t just attack villagers; it hunts them, picking its targets like a hitman with a contract, at one point even dragging a mattress out of a shack so it can lie comfortably in wait until the woodsman returns home. A few days later, the woodsman’s horrified friends discover remains “so small and so few they could have fit in a shirt pocket.”
 
A great read, especially if you’re getting ready for a camping trip where wild animals still thrive.
 
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